Sermon for 3/4/18 John 2:13-22

Over the last month or so, many of my days have included at least one activity. I have special clothes and shoes and everything for this activity. Yes, that’s right. I’ve been going to the gym. And I hate it. Well, hate is kind of a strong word. I’m not a fan. But I go. I actually try and make it a goal to go 6 out of 7 days a week. I stay for 30 minutes and I’m done. Yes, I feel better when I am done. But that doesn’t mean I like going. I don’t think I will ever be one of “those” people that answers my stress with exercise. That’s the biggest difference between my sister and myself. She gets stressed out and runs for 10 miles. I get stressed out and run towards Whitey’s. I wonder if I would feel different about working out if I thought about it as time with God instead. Thus comes the challenge of what it really means to believe in an incarnational God.

The odds are pretty good that I am going to use the word “incarnational” or “incarnation” a lot today. So, just to review I want to make sure you all know what I am talking about. We confess that we believe in an incarnational God. Which means we believe that God, through Jesus Christ took on the form of a human. Jesus was fully human and also fully divine. This does not mean that Jesus wore some kind of mask-like skin. It means that Jesus looked, felt, acted, and operated just like you and I do. Jesus was capable of all human traits, emotions, and actions. For some people, this can be a weird thing to think about. We don’t have an issue thinking of Jesus as divine. That’s pretty easy, actually. But, to picture Jesus as fully human, looking like and acting like someone we could interact with every single day may be a bit harder. But, and here’s where I want to make sure you’re really paying attention, God desires to be known. And we can’t get to know God through reading or through research. We just have to know that God is in us and feel it.

Instead of you telling me who God is, I want you to tell me how God feels. This is how I get to know God because of your stories. I don’t want to hear about how you saw God acting through other people. I want to hear how you felt God moving in your life. I want to hear how you felt God sobbing with you, laughing with you, groaning with you, and wondering with you. I want to hear how you encountered God through knowing with your whole heart that God is part of you and you are part of God. There are no books in the world that can replace a first-person experience. Are we brave enough to speak those words? I ask because it’s too easy for people to doubt us. It’s too easy for us to doubt ourselves. After all, who really is going to believe that God dwells in me? Who is going to believe that the all knowing dwells in  you?

“He was speaking of the temple of his body” (2.21). We can’t forget that God dwells in Jesus. This would be the same body to walk all over from Cana to Jerusalem, to every small town in between. This would be the body that would see a woman at the well, forgotten. This would be the body that would see a man blind from birth and heal him. This would be the body that would raise his friend Lazarus from the dead. And, this would be the body that would be hung on the cross, laid in a tomb, and resurrected. We cannot be church together, beloved, without first acknowledging that we truly believe we are the body of Christ.

This means that we first must believe that God dwells in us. We must believe that we have an incarnational God and for us, that changes everything. It changes and perhaps challenges everything because this means we don’t have a far off god that doesn’t care about us or doesn’t feel for us. We have a God that not only is near us, but in us, part of us. Do you hear me? This means that the Holy Spirit dwells in you. So, what you believe about your body is a direct reflection of what you believe about God. Additionally, what you believe about other bodies is a direct reflection of what you believe about God.

I think it is important that I repeat that again. What you believe to be true about other bodies is a direct reflection of what you believe to be true about God. If you believe that someone is less than because of their gender, then you believe God is less than worthy of your love and praise. If you believe that your white skin is somehow better than skin with more melanin, then we have limited what God looks like and made God in our own image. If you believe that bodies of only a certain size should be allowed to take up space, then how in the world can our God be everywhere? If you believe that perfection means 2 arms, 2 legs, and 10 fingers and toes, then we’ve once again limited what it means for God to become flesh. This means that when we view other people, we view them as keepers of God, just as we are. And when the body of Christ is being mistreated, it is to us as disciples to flip some tables.

Our incarnational God dwells in us too. Which means that the way we treat one another and maybe even more importantly, the way we treat ourselves, is a direct reflection on how we treat and view God. I am not going to the gym every day because I think God made a mistake in creating me and the body God gave me. I am going to the gym because I want to be a better mom and pastor. The incarnation allows us to discern what it means for God to be God in the form of humanity and what it means for humanity to be a reflection of God. Everything we experience is experienced by God and by the body of God. I hope it is a life changing revelation for you to know that God is not some far away being. God dwells in you and feels every single emotion you feel. God is not a being on high waiting to punish us. God is part of your flesh and bone waiting to experience life to the fullest.

The good news, my beloved, is that God does dwell in us. And although it may not always sound like good news, God dwells in everyone around us as well. This means we get to experience God through sharing our emotions and stories with one another. We can experience the incarnational God by being the body of Christ together. There is no sermon that will ever or can ever replace you proclaiming how the incarnational God has changed your life and how you experience the incarnational God changing the lives of those around you. We cannot forget that ministry is experienced, literally, in the body. We cannot separate ourselves from the body of Christ or from God incarnate. Thanks be to God.

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