3/12/17 John 3:1-17 Lent 2

Perhaps you’ve heard me say that the most used word in the Gospel of John is “abide.” In the original Greek text, “meno” can be translated as remain, or stay, but probably is most often translated as abide. What does it mean to abide? Webster says that it means to “bear patiently,” or to “endure without yielding.” It can also mean to “remain stable or in a fixed place” or “continue in a place.” I fear that abide is one of those words that is quickly considered to be old fashioned. The people that care about such statistics have actually noticed that the use of the word “abide” has declined in the last few decades. Why does any of this matter? Because in the Gospel of John, the idea of abide or “meno” is most frequently tied to relationships. God desires for us to abide in relationship not only to God but with one another.

We are even told at the beginning of John that “in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God…. And the Word became flesh and lived among us…” (John 1: 1,14). From the very start we know that John’s gospel is going to be about a very real God who came to abide in, with, and through us all. And, that this life-giving God loved and continues to love the world. So, if we know that John is all about abiding and relationships, then we can perhaps start to hear this Gospel through that lens. What does it mean to have a relationship with God? What does that look like in 2017 United States?

 I think when we speak about having a relationship with God we tend to start skating on thin ice. The evangelical movement has made sure of that in various ways. Now, I am not about to verbally chastise another church or their religious beliefs from the pulpit. But, I am sure all of us have heard at least once in our lives that we should have a deep and personal relationship with God. That we need to accept Jesus Christ as our personal Lord and Savior. That we need to be baptized in what is known as a “believers baptism” so that we can be born again. And while I admire evangelicals (especially how they aren’t afraid to speak to anyone–or so it seems–in order to save a life) there are some out in this world (even those who wouldn’t label themselves as “evangelical” that have started to use the Bible as a weapon.

Because verse 16 is often used as a velvet rope of sorts; a “who’s in and who’s out” in Christianity. Do you believe in God? Great! Eternal life! But if you don’t? Too bad. And really, brothers and sisters, is that the kind of God we want to claim? Is that the kind of God we lean on for hope, healing, and salvation? When we claim that God loves the world, do we have any idea how amazingly wonderful and yet maddening that can be? I am going to turn to the Greek (once again) in these verses. Both verse 16 and 17 use the word “world” several times. The greek here is “kosmos.” The cosmos, as we’re used to learning about it, is every last living, breathing, existing, cellular creature that has ever been and will ever be. Yet, the way we tend to think about the cosmos is either the world around us (as in our family, our town, even our country) or just the places we’re only slightly familiar with.

As a further example, we might say “God loves the World!” when what we really mean is “God loves me, the people around me, the people I like, and the people that I really want God to favor.” We cannot say “God loves the world” and in the same breath express “except you people over there!” Let’s think about scripture for just a moment. God loved a Samaritan woman (someone that society, culture, and rules said shouldn’t be loved). God loved a man so possessed with demons that when he was cured of those demons the demons inhabited pigs that immediately drowned themselves. God loved a man who was blind from birth. God loved Lazarus who had been dead for 4 days; dead to the point that the smell of death and doubt had already set in. God loved Judas so much that he fed him and washed his feet despite knowing that Judas would betray him. God loved a woman that had been hemorrhaging for 12 years. There are so many stories we could talk about that boil down to one concept: God loving the world.

Oh but how badly we want to put limits on that love! When will we learn that God’s love is not a precious commodity the way we think it is. It is a precious commodity in that God’s love is directly tied to our forgiveness of sins and ultimately, our life. But it is not a precious commodity in that it will ever run out. God’s love isn’t like oreo’s: it doesn’t come with a serving size. There is enough of God’s love for the entire cosmos. This means that there is enough love for you for a thousand lifetimes. And if we’re going to declare that God loves the world, then that means that God loves the entire world. God loves the person currently living in fear because of their immigration status. God loves the Jewish communities being victimized all over again with the destruction of their cemeteries. God loves our Muslim brothers and sisters who are vilified and painted as enemies of the state. How strong our own faith might be should we pray 5 times a day. God loves the young black man in a hoodie trying to get home with his skittles and iced-tea. God loves the young girl born as Eddie and is now Elizabeth. God loves the scarred and wounded and the perfectly coiffed and airbrushed.

What difference does it make in your life then that we have a God that not only loves the world, but invites the world into abiding in relationship with God? And that the world includes you? I can’t answer that for you. But, I do know that none of us are above needing saving and/or needing the love of God for daily survival. As I said earlier, this declaration of God’s love should be wonderful and maddening. It’s wonderful news for us who long to be saved. Who wear the badge of “Christian” proudly (but usually only like Nicodemus: at night, under the cover of darkness, when we can’t be seen or discovered). It’s wonderful news to us and for us who love other people (like our family and friends). But, it’s also maddening because we desire to limit God’s love, the influence of God’s love, and the actions of God’s love. We don’t want our enemies to receive this love. The only enemy we have, brothers and sisters, is Satan and our own sin. That’s it.

We want to find exceptions to the rule, don’t we. We pose theological quandaries like “if we say God loves the whole world do we really mean…” and then fill in the blank. And the answer is always “yes.” Even when we want the answer to be “no” the answer is “yes.” When we are born of water and of Spirit we are submitting to God and recognizing that our entire existence is dependent on God. Everything we are. Everything we’ve been and will be is dependent on God. And despite our desire to be dependent on ourselves, society, even pure dumb luck, God gives us everything we need; first and foremost that being love and salvation. This is a promise made not only to you, but every last speck of dirt, every last cell, every molecule in the entire cosmos. And it all starts with relationship and abiding in God.

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